Jack Marsh

PhD Student

Hometown
Easton, Pennsylvania

Education
PhD, Philosophy, SUNY Binghamton
MA, Philosophy, Boston College
BA, Philosophy, UNC Charlotte

Thesis Topic
Under the supervision of Judith Wolfe, my research enacts a constructive critique of Martin Heidegger’s philosophy of religion. Premised in an independent phenomenological analysis, I will show that experiences of joy and love – considered in light of the facticity of death and suffering – yield an (abyssal) ground for the meaningfulness of philosophy of religion in general, and of individuated religious communities of commitment specifically. I evidence my claims by a careful description of the livability, rationality, and possible desirability of the Christian faith as one living existential option among others; and through a demonstration of the basic intelligibility and coherence of theology as a discipline. Theology is the lived practice of taking responsibility for one’s fundamental commitments with moral, intellectual, and aesthetic integrity. 

Other Information
Jack is a former Instructor at the American University of Kuwait and Concordia International School, Shanghai. He is the author of Saying Violence: Levinas, Chauvinism, Disinterest (Albany: SUNY Press, forthcoming); editor of The Sway of the Good: Levinasian and Cohenian Essays (under review); and co-editor of Normativity, Meaning, and the Promise of Phenomenology (London: Routledge, 2019) and Transcending Reason: Heidegger’s Transformation of Phenomenology (London: Rowman & Littlefield, 2019). His work has appeared in multiple journals, including Philosophy and Social Criticism, Continental Philosophy Review, and Philosophy Today.